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September 8, 2014

Compulsory tyre pressure monitoring law to spark uplift in repairs

The introduction of new rules forcing manufacturers to install Tyre Pressure Monitoring Systems (TPMS) means workshops should be prepared for an expected increase in demand for repairs, says Autodata. 

The EU legislation has been rolled out progressively since November 2012, affecting new model ranges rather than older vehicle designs initially. From November this year, all new passenger vehicles sold must be equipped with TPMS.

The buoyant UK car industry was underlined in March, which saw new car registrations hit their highest point in a decade, rising 17.7% to 464,824*. Most manufacturers will have already acted to fully introduce the system before the legislation takes effect in November, when around two million more units equipped with TPMS will be on the road.

Autodata’s suite online platform covers TPMS systems used by more than 290 model ranges, enabling professional technicians to competently service vehicles equipped with the technology.

The leading supplier of technical information provides comprehensive general information on TPMS systems as well as technical data, system resetting procedures, sensor battery life, tool requirements and tyre changing information.

“Forward-thinking workshops and business owners will maximise the opportunity this presents by arming themselves with the best technical data to ensure that no time is wasted in maintaining or repairing these systems.”

Rod Williams, Autodata Chief Executive

TPMS systems can be expensive to repair, with TPMS sensors costing £50 to £150 for the part alone. In theory, the sensors should last for years but, due to wear and tear, corrosion or damage to the sleeve, valve cap, valve core and rubber grommet, which ensure it is air-tight, the sensor can fail prematurely.

Autodata’s Chief Executive, Rod Williams, said: “Automotive legislation is a constantly changing beast and can sometimes have a positive impact on the bottom line of a workshop.

“The systems aren’t bullet-proof and the number of cars on the road that feature TPMS is growing rapidly; forward-thinking workshops and business owners will maximise the opportunity this presents by arming themselves with the best technical data to ensure that no time is wasted in maintaining or repairing these systems.”

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